Green Moms

Updated: 10:42 March 25, 2014

Spring Cleaning: A Good Time for the Soul

 

Being in a family home for the past 9 years has shown me very quickly that spring cleaning is not a one-day operation.

Actually, it’s become more like a month-long torture machine, which explains why I procrastinate for as long as possible.

To add insult to injury, traditional cleaners are not mandated to list their toxic ingredients, and they don’t. Pair that with yet another “Toxins All Around Us” article or anti-chemical blog post from a friend with cancer, and I’m ready to wave the white flag of surrender and chuck all currently-owned harmful cleaning supplies to the curb.

But how will I survive?

It’s taken many years for me to appreciate and accept that non-toxic cleaners are as effective in cleaning as their poisonous counterparts. Before I was pregnant with our first child, all you could find in a natural foods store was a citrus-based all-purpose spray. I found it hard to believe that it was cleaning the kitchen and common surfaces well.

Then I had a baby, a cat, and numerous germs being brought into the house:  I felt the need—the need to disinfect!

As my boys grew, I didn’t want them to be exposed to any toxins while they crawled and explored the house. The stores offered more variety in natural cleaning supplies, so I also transitioned into finding safer alternatives for my wood protector, floor and glass cleaners, dishwashing and clothes washing detergents, and soaps.

But research showed me there was far to go!

Both boys now have a desire to help me clean the house (50 percent true interest to help, 50 percent desire to not lose their Legos for a week), and I feel that it is my duty to keep them as safe and protected as possible when they handle any cleaning agent.

A good, responsible natural cleaner will list its active and inert ingredients, but years of reading has proven to me that good ‘ol vinegar and baking soda can clean just about anything, including bathroom and kitchen surfaces, drains, windows and floors.

Here are a few of my favorite and most-proven homemade cleaning concoctions:

All-pupose cleaner:  Mix equal parts vinegar and water in a spray bottle. (You can add a few tablespoons of hydrogen peroxide for even more germ-fighting and disinfecting power!)

Drains:  Pour ½ cup of baking soda and ½ cup vinegar down drain, let sit for 15 minutes, flush with hot or boiling water.

Grout: Mix water and baking soda into a paste, rub into stain, let sit for 3 minutes and rinse.

Stainless steel:  Place vinegar-soaked towels around faucets, let sit for 25 minutes, then rinse with water.

Interiors of kitchen appliances: Sprinkle baking soda on a sponge, wipe down and rinse with water.

Toys:  Combine 4 tablespoons of baking soda with 1 quart of water. Wipe down toys.

Bonus new idea:  15 drops of tea tree essential oil mixed with 1 quart of water is another great disinfectant spray for most surfaces!

Please SHARE your favorite all-natural cleaning methods in the comments section for us all to enjoy!

 

Comments
Updated: 08:46 June 7, 2013

Finding Healthy Food On the Freeway!

I have a hard enough time compromising on “where/what to eat” with my two boys and husband when we are standing in the middle of the fifth largest city in the US, brimming with options.

We may have our four differing opinions on what we want to eat, but we all agree that good, tasty, healthy food trumps everything else.

So it comes as no surprise that road trips add another degree of difficulty to the process.

Road trip food blues

We left for a nine-hour drive to Toronto, traveling state turnpikes and thruways littered with the same reoccurring fast food chains that all quite literally repulsed us at every turn.

What are self-proclaimed “healthy, whole foods” parents to do when faced with unending miles of cheap, fatty, greasy, processed convenience junk?

You follow a Wegman’s truck.

Wegman’s or bust

Yep, that’s what we did. Well, almost. It was past noon, we had been driving for hours, and my husband refused to admit defeat when we couldn’t find a single acceptable restaurant on any of those royal blue Food/Lodging signs.

And then he spotted it.

“Look, there’s a Wegman’s truck! If we follow it, it’ll take us to a Wegman’s! With a Wegman’s food court! In-house roasted rotisserie chicken! And grilled veggies! And sushi! Ooo, and a smoothie bar!”

“Honey, I think that’s a bit of a stretch…” (But then I looked at his adorable pleading eyes and sullen face.) “Oh, OK, let’s have an adventure.”

So we pulled out the trusty cell phone, plugged in the Wegman’s website, tapped Store Locator with GPS map and voila:  Wegman’s in Canandaigua, NY. Lovely.

We may have traveled 20 miles south, spent twice as much, happened upon one of the Finger Lakes, and added 1.5 hours onto our trip, but taking control of our caloric/fat/sugar/salt intake was well worth it.

On the reverse trip, we had the same issue but with a bit more foresight and some extremely good luck.

Whole foods on the road

Knowing we were approaching the city of Binghamton, NY, for dinnertime, my husband pulled out his phone and simply using Google, quickly narrowed our independently-owned restaurant choices down to a quaint place called, Whole in the Wall.

Using only organic, locally-farmed, sustainable ingredients Whole in the Wall offered us all of the natural goodness we could possibly ask for from a “roadside” restaurant!

Homemade whole-grain breads and herb butters, rich and flavorful miso soup, crisp baby lettuce salads, free-range chicken, fresh fish broiled to perfection, organic wine from a local winery, and live entertainment by a local masquerading as a piano player… Yum!

Who knew with a little investigation, you could find fresh food utopia within 10 minutes of an exit ramp!

This entire experience reminded me that I need to do a little advance research for restaurant options during the travel portion of our vacation so we are never left in the dregs of food doldrums again. My family’s health, wellness and taste buds are entirely worth it.

Enjoy all of your summer adventures!

Meet Christa Sywulak-Herr
Christa is a green mom raising two boys with her husband in the suburbs of Philadelphia. A teacher by trade and an activist by heart, she volunteers her time to bettering the local community by promoting education, sustainability, and health and wellness. Christa enjoys nature hikes with her family, quality time with friends, shopping for treasures at the thrift shop, and cooking delicious meals from locally grown ingredients. A self-proclaimed “Reduce-Reuse-Recycler” since she was a child, Christa is eager to share all the eco-friendly tips she’s learned over the years and explore green living with TasteForLife.com readers.

Comments
Updated: 10:26 May 30, 2013

Kid-approved Salmon Dish

As anyone who follows my blog entries knows, despite my best intentions, cooking is not my forte. Nor is planning for cooking.

The other night, I was completely out of produce except for one lone lemon. I needed to go to the store but had neither the time nor the energy.

I knew I had the salmon fillets I pulled from the freezer the night before but wasn't sure I could pull off a meal.

Luckily, I had whole-grain angel hair pasta, so I Googled salmon and pasta and found several recipes. I modified to suit my empty refrigerator.

As long as you've had plenty of fruits and veggies during the day, this is a tasty, quick, and easy meal option for those nights when the fridge is almost empty and you are low energy.

Pasta Salmon Dish

Serves 2

What You Need

  • 1/2 box of whole-grain angel hair pasta
  • 2 salmon fillets, 1 inch thick
  • 2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO)
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp pepper
  • 2 Tbsp EVOO
  • 1/2 lemon

What You Do

1.Boil water and prepare pasta according to box directions.

2. Heat EVOO in medium saucepan over medium heat.

3. Add defrosted salmon fillets.

4. Cook one side for three minutes. Flip. Cook other side for three minutes.

5. While salmon is cooking, season the pasta by adding garlic, salt, pepper, and EVOO.

6. Return to salmon and it should be just about done.

7. Place pasta on plate and top with salmon, which you can cut up.

8. Drizzle 1/4 piece of lemon wedge over salmon and pasta.

 

My daughter wrote her own meal review below.

10-Year Old Kai Schildmeier’s Review

Tonight for dinner my mom cooked us salmon fillets and pasta. Here are my opinions:

First, on the plate my eyes went straight to the salmon. The salmon was good but not the best I’ve ever had (prefer it in sushi).

The first couple of bites I took were absolutely divine. But the flavor started getting boring to me. It tastes like swordfish and looks like swordfish but in an orange way.

It gets stuck in your braces but doesn’t feel like it’s in them even though it’s there. Overall though, I suggest this dish for any fish lover.

Now, on the other hand, the pasta—absolutely, totally yummy. It’s garlicky, but good. Overall, I would really want my mom to make this yummy plate of pasta again tomorrow.

After three decades as a lacto-ovo vegetarian, Christine "Cissy" White started eating fish. She enjoys blogging about family-friendly fish dishes, and how to shop for, prepare and cook healthy and affordable fish meals with her 10-year old daughter, Kai. White has been published in Elephant Journal, Adoption Today and Literary Mama and blogs at guestinyourheart.wordpress.com.

 

Comments
Updated: 08:15 May 15, 2013

Tastes Like It Took Longer Fish Dish

 

If, like me, you are cooking for only two, it’s not always fun or inherently rewarding to go to a lot of trouble to make dinner.

Add to that cooking is not my thing, and my 10-year old doesn’t applaud me for my efforts. She’d be happier if I went through the drive-through at McDonalds—which is not going to happen.

If you want an easy but healthy fish recipe, I have a cod recipe for you. Cod is a low-calorie, mild-tasting fish that provides protein, omega 3s, B vitamins, and vitamin D. 

I made it tonight based on a very complex recipe I found on the Internet and modified to my level. Total prep and bake time will be 30 minutes, max, I promise. 

What you need:

  • Nonstick cooking spray
  • Cod, 3 fillets (defrosted, if frozen)* 
  • Mustard (any flavor)                                                                                                               
  • 1/4 c crushed almonds                                                        
  • 3 tsp olive oil                                                                                                                        
  • Salt                                                                                                                                   
  • Pepper  
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced     
  • Bag of organic spinach
  • Organic lemon                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

Instructions:                                                                   

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Coat a cookie sheet with nonstick cooking spray.
  3. Place cod fillets on top of cookie sheet and spread a teaspoon of mustard on each one.
  4. Place crushed almonds in a small bowl. Pour a teaspoon of olive oil over the almonds. Mix in salt and pepper to taste. Stir mixture and spread it on top of the cod.
  5. Bake cod for 10 minutes.
  6. While cod is baking, heat remaining 2 teaspoons of olive oil in a pan on stovetop on medium low. Add garlic and saute.
  7. Mix in spinach and cook on low heat until you are ready to serve fish.
  8. Cut up lemon wedges for flavoring.

Feedback: I liked the crushed almonds on the cod but my daughter, who has braces, flicked them off of her fish. We both agreed that the mustard coating was too strong a taste for both of us. Next time, I will try preparing the cod with a tiny bit of olive oil and generous amount of salt, pepper, and lemon—seasonings more to my taste. But for those who find cod a bit on the bland side, the mustard might be just the thing!

*The best way to thaw frozen seafood is in the fridge overnight. If you are in a rush, seal frozen fish in a plastic bag and immerse in cold water for a short time. 

Learn how to choose quality seafood at the market—fresh or frozen.

Sustainability tip: Choose Pacific cod off the coast of Alaska. According to the Monterey Bay Aquarium, other good choices for sustainability are Atlantic cod from Iceland and the Northeast Arctic.

 

About Christine "Cissy" White:

After three decades as a lacto-ovo vegetarian, Christine "Cissy" White started eating fish. She enjoys blogging about family-friendly fish dishes, and how to shop for, prepare and cook healthy and affordable fish meals with her 10-year old daughter, Kai. White has been published in Elephant JournalAdoption Today and Literary Mama and blogs at guestinyourheart.wordpress.com.

 

 

Comments
Updated: 06:55 April 19, 2013

The Smoothie Cheat Sheet

 

My sister-in-law doesn’t eat any processed foods, cooks from scratch, and uses the juice squeezed from oranges to sweeten her hot tea. She pre-cuts the week’s fruit so at breakfast her children can simply pull it out and add what they want to their yogurt.

I am not that kind of mother.

I don’t think about food until the moment I am hungry or my 10-year old is demanding a meal. Which doesn’t mean I don’t care about her health or mine. I do. I’m just not a “foodie” or a person who enjoys food preparation. 

I could eat a tuna fish sandwich for dinner every night for a year without getting bored if I wasn’t worried about our mercury consumption. In some of my less-proud moments, I have actually put mayonnaise right in the can so I don’t have to dirty a bowl. I’ve skipped chopping an onion or cutting a tomato if I’m in a hurry. I’m not exactly a gourmet girl.

So, I have come up with many shortcuts and techniques to get fresh fruits and veggies into our family diet. Maybe my tricks can help you.

Doing the Math

First, I ask my math-minded daughter almost daily how many fruits and vegetables she has had. She has to name them and tell me the color and amount each night. Five different ones is our “minimum,” and seven is the goal we shoot for daily. If either (or both of us) has fallen short, we end the day with a smoothie. 

This is my version of a daily multivitamin (which we also take when we remember), but it comes in the form of fresh food. Our smoothies start with yogurt—whole fat for my lean daughter who needs to gain a few pounds and low or non-fat for me.

We scour the kitchen and add blueberries, strawberries, and raspberries (fresh or frozen depending on time of year and sale prices), as well as oranges, apples, bananas, and vegetables such as spinach and lettuce.

Flavor is not the primary goal though they always taste really good. Our goal is to add color (yellow, orange, red, blue, and green) to the blender and our bodies before we go to bed.

I like to sweeten my smoothies with a little organic peanut butter which, with the yogurt, balances out the natural sugars with protein. I also add flax seed, wheat germ, and apple cider or lemon juice if I have it as well as ice cubes so the texture is thick.

(Note for new smoothie drinkers: skip the wheat germ or flax seed if you're turned off by the gritty texture.) Also, for children (or adults) used to super-sweet, not-so-healthy smoothies, the all-natural homemade ones can taste a little watery. Be aware of who you are serving and add more peanut butter or a scoop of frozen yogurt or a drop of vanilla to make it sweeter.

 If you are a natural in the kitchen, like my sister-in-law, you have probably had your full serving of fruits and veggies by nine a.m. If not, feel free to use my “smoothie cheat” recipe to help you get over your not-yet-green-enough or organic-enough guilt. 

What's your favorite way of "sneaking" more healthy habits into your or your family's day?

Comments
Updated: 09:36 April 3, 2013

Waking from Hibernation . . .

 

The yearly transformation from winter to spring is upon us!

Minds and bodies are waking up. We long for fresh air, exercise, a recharge in vitamin D levels, and the buds and blossoms of the rebirth season!

Greet Spring

Since my family doesn’t take a traditional spring vacation, I’ve spent the past few years compiling a list of fun outdoor explorations to welcome the season.

Most ideas grew out of hearing the clever moniker “No Child Left Inside.” Richard Louv’s 2005 book, Last Child In the Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature-Deficit Disorder, truly made an impact on me. My older son was 4 at the time, his brother 1, and I did not want our family to succumb to the inactivity and routine of indoor habits. (Read an excerpt of Louv’s book here.) 

We started small but fast-forward a few years and our “Spring Has Sprung” list is many pages long! Here are some of our favorite things to do in spring. I hope they inspire you to start your own traditions!

Try Local!

Neighborhood walks or bike rides are my family’s constant. We live less than two blocks from the main tributary of our township’s creek system. It’s a mile-long parkway flanked with walking/running/biking paths, sports fields, playgrounds, and sandy beaches with ecosystems to explore. We always bring a camera to take shots of flowering trees and emerging bulbs.

Eager for both a woodsy walk and a little culture? Local arboretums and gardens are exploding with the early buds of spring. Some have outdoor art and sculpture exhibits, perfect for young minds to contemplate and critique. Others have tree houses, hands-on nature crafting, or tours specifically designed for school-aged children.

Planning your backyard garden? Neighborhood nurseries love to teach the history and benefits of native plants to your area. Those that allow wandering through the greenhouses add an additional thrill and pique the curiosity of young gardeners.

Want to add an educational element to your adventure? Area college campuses are exploding with blooms! Set a blanket down in the middle of the main university lawn, open a picnic lunch, and celebrate spring.

Add some bird-watching into the mix! You can view the vast array of migrating avians returning “home” in your own backyard.

Even in the center of our city, we are able to use binoculars to spot red-tailed hawks that nest and hatch their young on the windowsill of the science museum; the peregrine falcons that roost atop the highest skyscrapers, and the bald eagle family who expands yearly in a wildlife preserve bordering the airport!

Here are 13 more nature activities Louv recommends for kids and families.  

What’s your favorite outdoor spring adventure? 

Comments
Updated: 06:10 March 14, 2013

Get Your Fish On!


“Everyone is vegetarian now,” my friend Kathy said, “And you’re going to start eating meat?”

“Yes,” I said. “But just fish. It’s time.”

I’d read about all the benefits of consuming the omega 3s in fish oil. I was intrigued by the promises of better mood, memory, and yes, I admit it, healthier hair. 

Plus, I wanted to ensure that my growing daughter was getting the nutrients she needed. And I wanted to give her the option of eating fish, instead of taking supplements.

Culinary Chaos

The only problem was that I had been a dedicated vegetarian since the age of 14, and was not exactly savvy in the kitchen. I’ve blown up the whites of hard-boiled eggs. I’ve had to re-read the directions for making instant oatmeal. Just yesterday it took me two tries to make a grilled cheese sandwich—and I burnt the crust both times.

How was I going to learn how to shop for, prepare, and cook seafood and make sure it was edible and safe for my 10-year-old?

Adding fish back to my diet was easy and exciting—as long as I was at a restaurant. But now that I wanted to learn how to cook seafood at home, it was a little intimidating. I lie. It was daunting.

I liken it to learning how to drive on the highway. It’s not the hands on the wheel and foot on the gas that’s tricky, it’s following directions, switching lanes, and paying attention to the passenger all at the same time. It took me years of practice . . . I think it’s going to be a similar process to master seafood in the kitchen.

OK, so I may start with tuna fish casserole before serving homemade crab cakes, but I am going to learn. I will teach my daughter so she is relaxed and comfortable in the kitchen.

Luckily, I have a role model. My mother raised three children on spaghetti, macaroni salad, instant mashed potatoes, and Steak-umms (remember those?!).

But in midlife, Mom shifted gears and taught herself to cook gourmet meals. I can do the same.

I’m not going to let the fear of driving keep me from the open road or the fear of failing at fish dishes from the open stove! Join me in the adventure—and feel free to share your favorite recipes and tips!

Mind the Mercury

How much canned tuna can you safely eat? Learn how much mercury is in your favorite fish.

Use this mercury calculator to see if the amount of fish you’re eating is putting you above the safety zone!

 

About Christine “Cissy” White

After three decades as a dedicated lacto-ovo vegetarian, Christine "Cissy" White started eating fish. She enjoys blogging about family-friendly fish dishes, and how to shop for, prepare and cook healthy and affordable fish meals once a week with her 10-year old daughter, Kai. White has been published in Elephant Journal, Adoption Today and Literary Mama and blogs at www.guestinyourheart.wordpress.com

 

 

 

Comments
Updated: 01:09 March 12, 2013

Recycling Nirvana?

 

It’s finally here!

My giddiness has only been diminished by the fact that I still have to wait until April 1st to use it!

Last year I thought nothing could top the early Christmas present I received when my township announced that it would finally extend its plastics collection to include #1 through #7.

Then this past November we were informed that our entire recycling program would become fully automated, allowing each resident to become new owners of those glorious, co-mingled, rolling recycling carts we had envied in surrounding neighborhoods for years!

Finally! No more lugging multiple small, dripping, overflowing, back-breaking bins to the curb. I now have a system allowing ease, peace-of-mind, and increased efficiency as our family continues to improve its recycling efforts.

I chose the largest of the three options:  the 95-galloner. Oh, it’s such a beautiful sight! Being a family that already recycles twice as much material as we trash, I figured this would only encourage us to not only “up” our skills, but also gather more recyclables from places like work and school to bring home and properly dispose of.

Additionally, “Big Blue” (as we are affectionately calling it) can now accrue its load over multiple weeks and be put out bi- or tri-weekly, allowing for more streamlining of the pick-up process, thus reducing carbon monoxide emissions from the truck.

All is right with the world!

Right?

As the “buzz” on social media began, I listened to friends and neighbors as they shared their opinions of the new and old systems. What about the recycling workers and their jobs? Is this more or less expensive for taxpayers? Does co-mingling even make sense? Doesn’t recycling only go to the trash dump anyway?

Hmmm… I’ve never been one to sit amongst rumor for too long, so I tracked down our township public works manager to ask questions.

Most things were easily answered: All worker jobs were retained. The $1 million price tag should be recouped in less than 6 years through operating cost reduction, grants, and recycling revenue increases.

Other questions, however, were still unsettling: Go ahead—just throw everything in, including plastic caps, milk/OJ cartons, and loose paper. (But what about contamination, making the recyclables un-usable?) The recycling facility finds a use for everything. (Meaning it just sends excessive amounts of materials to China?) Do these solutions not completely defeat the purpose?

I have created some instant responses to these additional questions. First, I’m visiting that recycling plant. I want to see first-hand where and how my recyclables are being processed!

Second, my commitment to simple REDUCTION is stronger than ever! Our family has been brainstorming ways to shop more eco-friendly and bring home the least amount of packaging possible.

Moral of the story: My giddiness is replaced with hope and “To be continued…”

 

Meet Christa Sywulak-Herr
Christa is a green mom raising two boys with her husband in the suburbs of Philadelphia. A teacher by trade and an activist by heart, she volunteers her time to bettering the local community by promoting education, sustainability, and health and wellness. Christa enjoys nature hikes with her family, quality time with friends, shopping for treasures at the thrift shop, and cooking delicious meals from locally grown ingredients. A self-proclaimed “Reduce-Reuse-Recycler” since she was a child, Christa is eager to share all the eco-friendly tips she’s learned over the years and explore green living with TasteForLife.com readers.

Comments
Updated: 07:17 March 1, 2013

Shaping Minds, Saving the Planet


There are many joys in parenting yet nothing prepared me for realizing just how much we influence our children—especially when it comes to ideas we are passionate about.  Oh, we talk at them and with them a lot, but how much of our values are absorbed by these constantly moving, thinking, rambling little beings? 

I recently asked my boys, “What are some of the ways I’ve taught you to be more environmentally friendly?”  My 8 year-old responded without missing a beat, “Three words, Mom: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.”

Well, THAT was easy! So the past decade has not gone to waste after all! (Insert smiley face of astonishment here.) 

As my 11 year-old ticked off ways we practice eco-friendly practices, his little brother categorized:

“We don’t let the water run.”

“Reduce.”

“We bring our own bags to stores.”

“Reuse.”

“We have plastic, metal, glass, paper and cardboard bins.”

“Recycle. See, Mom? You’ve taught us!”

But my boys were just warming up. They rattled off the following ways they’ve learned to protect the earth: 

1. “Turn off the lights. 

2. Buy recycled products.

3. Shop at thrift stores. 

4. Buy local. 

5. Carpool.

6. Tell the government when you’re not happy about something that’s happening to the earth, air or water. 

7. Only put healthy things in and on your body.

Wow, my kids know all that?  Impressive!  

But here was the real clincher:  After we chatted about the list, older bro states, “Remember, we have to do all of these things all the time because you know, we only have one planet earth and we have to take care of it!”  And that was how I realized I was making an impact. 

None of this happened overnight. I had to start small and build on it. 

Take household recycling:  During toddlerhood, I explained the different recycled materials, and we made treasured creations out of trash. 

In preschool, they helped mommy carry jars, cans, and magazines to the mudroom, finding the appropriate recycling receptacle all by themselves. 

Now in the elementary years, they are the first to recommend that we carry out all of our bottles or cups from any restaurant that does not recycle glass or plastic.

I have two compassionate kids who can articulate and follow-through with their intentions. As each year passes, they listen, they learn, and they increase their level of understanding. 

The best part is that all parents can influence their children’s eco-consciousness! 

From the very beginning, the many years of talking and doing are really teaching. That teaching leads to awareness, which then leads to caring. And nothing is accomplished in this world without caring. 

 

 

Meet Christa Sywulak-Herr
Christa is a green mom raising two boys with her husband in the suburbs of Philadelphia. A teacher by trade and an activist by heart, she volunteers her time to bettering the local community by promoting education, sustainability, and health and wellness. Christa enjoys nature hikes with her family, quality time with friends, shopping for treasures at the thrift shop, and cooking delicious meals from locally grown ingredients. A self-proclaimed “Reduce-Reuse-Recycler” since she was a child, Christa is eager to share all the eco-friendly tips she’s learned over the years and explore green living with TasteForLife.com readers.

Comments

Latest blog posts

Spring Cleaning: A Good Time for the Soul

Green Moms  Being in a family home for the past 9 years has shown me very quickly that spring cleaning is not a one-day operation.Actually, it’s become more like a month-long torture machine, which explains why I procrastinate for as long as possible.To add insult to injury, traditional cleaners... Read more

What's Your Dream?

Destination True North Have you ever had a moment when you realized you had to make a choice between staid status quo and living an adventure, a dream? Perhaps, there was nothing wrong with life in the here and now,  or perhaps you were facing heartache or a challenge that felt like a mountain of worldly... Read more

Juicifying Life!

Taste For Life Blog I have friends who swear by juicing, including one who claims he felt almost euphoric for more than a week due to drinking juice breakfasts. I love being able to buy a nice, freshly wrangled juice, especially at our new community co-op where there’s a juice and smoothie bar.But to make my own... Read more

Don't Let Passion Slip Away!

Destination True North How many times have you said you wanted to do something—you've pined away for going to an event or taking up a passion—and somehow it doesn't happen. It's not that the hands of times slip idly through your fingertips...it's simply that, if you are anything like yours... Read more

Garden Therapy

Destination True North  There is nothing like gardening to restore your faith in the nature of things. And, I want to support the efforts of those who are dedicated to growing things—to buy locally and to be more connected to the source. I've made a vow to myself this summer to visit supermarkets as... Read more

Advertisements